Level One - Improv Class This class is taught by Tyler Howard. Tyler has performed in several shows for the Mary C. since 2010, productions for Ocean Springs High School, including being on their Competition Theatre team. He was in an improv troupe called Lab Rats at Mississippi State University from 2012-2016, where he performed monthly and practiced weekly. He also performed twice in Atlanta at the Basement Theater, once as a Lab Rat and once of his own independent capacity. From there, he further studied improv in Chicago at the iO Theater under the curriculum of Del Close and Charna Halpern. Lesson Plan Every class will begin with 10-15 minutes of warm ups and exercises designed to put players into the right headspace for improvising, and building up energy to be maintained throughout the session. These exercises may include but are not limited to: Zip-Zap-Zop: An exercise that emphasizes eye contact, passing focus, and group-oriented cohesion. Players must hold the designated pattern (usually Zip-Zap-Zop) by pointing to the player they are passing to and saying the next word in the pattern. Ex. Player One starts by saying Zip and pointing and making eye contact with Player Three. Player Three says Zap as they point and look to Player Two, who says Zop as they pass it to the next, who starts over at Zip and so on and so forth, building speed and energy. Vroom: An exercise that emphasizes listening, physicality, and high energy. Players stand in a circle and pass the focus circularly by saying Vroom! and making an associated physical movement. Optional variants include adding Screech! which changes the direction of the circle, and Turbo! which continues the flow but jumps over the next person in the circle. As before, the players will build speed and energy as they become more confident with their anticipation of patterns. Electric Company: A fast-paced exercise that emphasizes out-of-head thinking, group mentality, and word association. Players stand in circle and keep a rhythm through clapping or snapping. One player says a word to the person next in the circle and the second player says the first word that comes to their mind. The group repeats the two words in unison and chants a cadence in rhythm. This continues around the circle, building speed and energy as the players find the rhythm and gets out of their head. Crazy 8s: A physical exercise that emphasizes free movement, high energy, and escalation. Players move each of their four limbs on the count of 8 until all four limbs have swung or stomped 8 times, and then repeat the process counting to 7, and then again to 6, so on and so forth. Speed naturally increases as they are switching between limbs faster between each countdown as the countdown grows smaller. Pirates at Sea: A silly, fun, high-energy exercise that emphasizes high energy, teamwork, and breaking shyness in front of their fellow players. It is a predetermined routine with a song and choreography that increases in silliness as the song goes on. Players are encouraged to have fun with this exercise and not be afraid to look silly doing so. Below is the framework for a week to week lesson plan bounded within the four weeks the course will run. Week One: The Three “Rules” of Improv, Getting Out of Your Head, Three-Line Scenes In the first week, I will go through with the players the three “Rules” of improv. These rules are not absolutes in improv, but they are important for new improvisers to understand the basics of creating an improvised performance. These three “Rules” are as follows: Yes, And Improv is founded on the support of your fellow players, and every player must know how to not only say Yes to a fellow player's idea, but they must know to always add to the idea, to constantly be building and growing a scene. Players must be able to know that they can trust each other and not walk into a scene and be immediately shot down. No Questions While not a cardinal sin, asking questions tends to force your other players to be put on the spot, and doesn't inherently add to the scene. Rather than demonizing the concept of ever asking a question in a scene, this “Rule” more encourages players to be confident in their decisions and make statements rather than let their other players make all the decisions in a scene. Don't Go For The Joke Improvised theatre is often associated with the more comedic aspects of the performance arts. Improv can be quite funny, however, the comedy of the craft is not derived from going for the joke of the scene, but, rather, from the maintenance of the natural flow of a scene. Going for the Joke can be a counter intuitive mindset and tends to cheapen the scene at the expense of the rest of the players. This “Rule” is not meant to disparage the comedy that will come from an improvised scene, but to emphasize that adding to a scene and taking care of your scene partners is more important than getting to a quick quip. Also within Week One, I will be working with the players on the techniques to Get Out Of Their Head. Within an improvised setting, content comes from the players themselves. It can be difficult to continuously provide new material, but the tried and true philosophy of improv is to get out of one's head. Someone stuck inside their own head has difficultly listening and thinking out of the box to manage a scene. Warm-up exercises, word association, and group work are techniques I will use to foment the players' growth into extemporaneous performers. Finally, in Week One, I will instruct the players into basic scene work with Three-Line Scenes, where players are made to create a scene that establishes who they are to each other, what they are doing, and where they are within three lines. This limitation is to warm up players to their first

Level One - Improv Class This class is taught by Tyler Howard. Tyler has performed in several shows for the Mary C. since 2010, productions for Ocean Springs High School, including being on their Competition Theatre team. He was in an improv troupe called Lab Rats at Mississippi State University from 2012-2016, where he performed monthly and practiced weekly. He also performed twice in Atlanta at the Basement Theater, once as a Lab Rat and once of his own independent capacity. From there, he further studied improv in Chicago at the iO Theater under the curriculum of Del Close and Charna Halpern. Lesson Plan Every class will begin with 10-15 minutes of warm ups and exercises designed to put players into the right headspace for improvising, and building up energy to be maintained throughout the session. These exercises may include but are not limited to: Zip-Zap-Zop: An exercise that emphasizes eye contact, passing focus, and group-oriented cohesion. Players must hold the designated pattern (usually Zip-Zap-Zop) by pointing to the player they are passing to and saying the next word in the pattern. Ex. Player One starts by saying Zip and pointing and making eye contact with Player Three. Player Three says Zap as they point and look to Player Two, who says Zop as they pass it to the next, who starts over at Zip and so on and so forth, building speed and energy. Vroom: An exercise that emphasizes listening, physicality, and high energy. Players stand in a circle and pass the focus circularly by saying Vroom! and making an associated physical movement. Optional variants include adding Screech! which changes the direction of the circle, and Turbo! which continues the flow but jumps over the next person in the circle. As before, the players will build speed and energy as they become more confident with their anticipation of patterns. Electric Company: A fast-paced exercise that emphasizes out-of-head thinking, group mentality, and word association. Players stand in circle and keep a rhythm through clapping or snapping. One player says a word to the person next in the circle and the second player says the first word that comes to their mind. The group repeats the two words in unison and chants a cadence in rhythm. This continues around the circle, building speed and energy as the players find the rhythm and gets out of their head. Crazy 8s: A physical exercise that emphasizes free movement, high energy, and escalation. Players move each of their four limbs on the count of 8 until all four limbs have swung or stomped 8 times, and then repeat the process counting to 7, and then again to 6, so on and so forth. Speed naturally increases as they are switching between limbs faster between each countdown as the countdown grows smaller. Pirates at Sea: A silly, fun, high-energy exercise that emphasizes high energy, teamwork, and breaking shyness in front of their fellow players. It is a predetermined routine with a song and choreography that increases in silliness as the song goes on. Players are encouraged to have fun with this exercise and not be afraid to look silly doing so. Below is the framework for a week to week lesson plan bounded within the four weeks the course will run. Week One: The Three “Rules” of Improv, Getting Out of Your Head, Three-Line Scenes In the first week, I will go through with the players the three “Rules” of improv. These rules are not absolutes in improv, but they are important for new improvisers to understand the basics of creating an improvised performance. These three “Rules” are as follows: Yes, And Improv is founded on the support of your fellow players, and every player must know how to not only say Yes to a fellow player's idea, but they must know to always add to the idea, to constantly be building and growing a scene. Players must be able to know that they can trust each other and not walk into a scene and be immediately shot down. No Questions While not a cardinal sin, asking questions tends to force your other players to be put on the spot, and doesn't inherently add to the scene. Rather than demonizing the concept of ever asking a question in a scene, this “Rule” more encourages players to be confident in their decisions and make statements rather than let their other players make all the decisions in a scene. Don't Go For The Joke Improvised theatre is often associated with the more comedic aspects of the performance arts. Improv can be quite funny, however, the comedy of the craft is not derived from going for the joke of the scene, but, rather, from the maintenance of the natural flow of a scene. Going for the Joke can be a counter intuitive mindset and tends to cheapen the scene at the expense of the rest of the players. This “Rule” is not meant to disparage the comedy that will come from an improvised scene, but to emphasize that adding to a scene and taking care of your scene partners is more important than getting to a quick quip. Also within Week One, I will be working with the players on the techniques to Get Out Of Their Head. Within an improvised setting, content comes from the players themselves. It can be difficult to continuously provide new material, but the tried and true philosophy of improv is to get out of one's head. Someone stuck inside their own head has difficultly listening and thinking out of the box to manage a scene. Warm-up exercises, word association, and group work are techniques I will use to foment the players' growth into extemporaneous performers. Finally, in Week One, I will instruct the players into basic scene work with Three-Line Scenes, where players are made to create a scene that establishes who they are to each other, what they are doing, and where they are within three lines. This limitation is to warm up players to their first

Alabama Shakespeare Festival: Much Ado About Nothing The Alabama Shakespeare Festival is among the ten largest Shakespeare festivals in the world. The festival is permanently housed in the Carolyn Blount Theatre in Montgomery, Alabama and will be coming to the Mary C. Day/Date: Thursday, October 12th Time: Class: 10:00a.m. Workshop: 11:30a.m. Price: Class $5.00 Student Workshop: $5.00 Class  & Workshop: $10.00

 Blood Country - Film Blood Country tells the true story of events which took place in and around Lawrence County, Mississippi in 1884, based on the short story by Robert E. Jones titled "The Outlaw, the Sheriff and the Governor". The film is about a man accused of killing his brother and the honorable sheriff who has to bring him to justice. This Western film features actor Jeremy London, an Ocean Springs resident, and other talent from the Mississippi Gulf Coast.  Rated: PG-13 Day/Date: Friday, November 3rd Time: 7:00pm Price: $10.00

Level One - Improv Class This class is taught by Tyler Howard. Tyler has performed in several shows for the Mary C. since 2010, productions for Ocean Springs High School, including being on their Competition Theatre team. He was in an improv troupe called Lab Rats at Mississippi State University from 2012-2016, where he performed monthly and practiced weekly. He also performed twice in Atlanta at the Basement Theater, once as a Lab Rat and once of his own independent capacity. From there, he further studied improv in Chicago at the iO Theater under the curriculum of Del Close and Charna Halpern. Lesson Plan Every class will begin with 10-15 minutes of warm ups and exercises designed to put players into the right headspace for improvising, and building up energy to be maintained throughout the session. These exercises may include but are not limited to: Zip-Zap-Zop: An exercise that emphasizes eye contact, passing focus, and group-oriented cohesion. Players must hold the designated pattern (usually Zip-Zap-Zop) by pointing to the player they are passing to and saying the next word in the pattern. Ex. Player One starts by saying Zip and pointing and making eye contact with Player Three. Player Three says Zap as they point and look to Player Two, who says Zop as they pass it to the next, who starts over at Zip and so on and so forth, building speed and energy. Vroom: An exercise that emphasizes listening, physicality, and high energy. Players stand in a circle and pass the focus circularly by saying Vroom! and making an associated physical movement. Optional variants include adding Screech! which changes the direction of the circle, and Turbo! which continues the flow but jumps over the next person in the circle. As before, the players will build speed and energy as they become more confident with their anticipation of patterns. Electric Company: A fast-paced exercise that emphasizes out-of-head thinking, group mentality, and word association. Players stand in circle and keep a rhythm through clapping or snapping. One player says a word to the person next in the circle and the second player says the first word that comes to their mind. The group repeats the two words in unison and chants a cadence in rhythm. This continues around the circle, building speed and energy as the players find the rhythm and gets out of their head. Crazy 8s: A physical exercise that emphasizes free movement, high energy, and escalation. Players move each of their four limbs on the count of 8 until all four limbs have swung or stomped 8 times, and then repeat the process counting to 7, and then again to 6, so on and so forth. Speed naturally increases as they are switching between limbs faster between each countdown as the countdown grows smaller. Pirates at Sea: A silly, fun, high-energy exercise that emphasizes high energy, teamwork, and breaking shyness in front of their fellow players. It is a predetermined routine with a song and choreography that increases in silliness as the song goes on. Players are encouraged to have fun with this exercise and not be afraid to look silly doing so. Below is the framework for a week to week lesson plan bounded within the four weeks the course will run. Week One: The Three “Rules” of Improv, Getting Out of Your Head, Three-Line Scenes In the first week, I will go through with the players the three “Rules” of improv. These rules are not absolutes in improv, but they are important for new improvisers to understand the basics of creating an improvised performance. These three “Rules” are as follows: Yes, And Improv is founded on the support of your fellow players, and every player must know how to not only say Yes to a fellow player's idea, but they must know to always add to the idea, to constantly be building and growing a scene. Players must be able to know that they can trust each other and not walk into a scene and be immediately shot down. No Questions While not a cardinal sin, asking questions tends to force your other players to be put on the spot, and doesn't inherently add to the scene. Rather than demonizing the concept of ever asking a question in a scene, this “Rule” more encourages players to be confident in their decisions and make statements rather than let their other players make all the decisions in a scene. Don't Go For The Joke Improvised theatre is often associated with the more comedic aspects of the performance arts. Improv can be quite funny, however, the comedy of the craft is not derived from going for the joke of the scene, but, rather, from the maintenance of the natural flow of a scene. Going for the Joke can be a counter intuitive mindset and tends to cheapen the scene at the expense of the rest of the players. This “Rule” is not meant to disparage the comedy that will come from an improvised scene, but to emphasize that adding to a scene and taking care of your scene partners is more important than getting to a quick quip. Also within Week One, I will be working with the players on the techniques to Get Out Of Their Head. Within an improvised setting, content comes from the players themselves. It can be difficult to continuously provide new material, but the tried and true philosophy of improv is to get out of one's head. Someone stuck inside their own head has difficultly listening and thinking out of the box to manage a scene. Warm-up exercises, word association, and group work are techniques I will use to foment the players' growth into extemporaneous performers. Finally, in Week One, I will instruct the players into basic scene work with Three-Line Scenes, where players are made to create a scene that establishes who they are to each other, what they are doing, and where they are within three lines. This limitation is to warm up players to their first